Allena Nguyen

Research Assistant (Co-Op) at AFCC
Executive at UBC Undergraduate Chemistry Society

I am a highly motivated third year UBC chemistry co-op student with strong interests in materials chemistry, nanotechnology, and climate change. Ultimately, I am hoping to research and develop products and technology that contribute to climate mitigation.

More About Me

I am a UBC chemistry co-op student with strong interests in materials chemistry, nanotechnology, and climate change. Ultimately, I am hoping to research and develop products and technology that contribute to climate mitigation.

I am currently working as a research assistant at AFCC, and am involved with developing and performing experiments to design and characterize anode catalyst inks for PEM fuel cells, and supporting the prototyping team through studying various ink formulations and preparation processes.

You can contact me at allenanguyen@gmail.com

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Geranium Nanoparticles
Imaged above (top) are different solutions containing fixed concentrations of Ge NPs with varying quantities of H2O2 (the quantities increase as you move left to right).1 Note that the cuvette on the far left comprises of Ge NPs dispersed in pure water.
The synthesis of the Germanium nanoparticles (Ge NPs) was done via laser pyrolysis (bottom left), a “gas phase process for the synthesis of nanomaterials,” and the size of the Ge NPs was controlled by an etching procedure based on the oxidation of the Ge NPs.12 Adding Ge NPs to solutions of H2O2 cause the Ge NPs to be surrounded by an oxide layer (bottom right), which can be easy removed by treating the Ge NPs with HCl (bottom right).1
To read in detail about the procedure of the synthesis of Ge NPs, I recommend reading through the referenced article. Note that journal access is required. Images courtesy of Kim et. al.

Kim, S.; Walker, B.; Park, S.; Choi, H.; Ko, S.; Jeong, J.; Yun, M.; Lee, J.; Kim, d.; Kim, J. Size tailoring of aqueous germanium nanoparticle dispersion. Nanoscale. 2014. DOI: 10.1039/C4NR01596G


Chiruvolu, S.; Li, W.; Ng, K.; Du, K.; Ting, K.; McGovern, W.E.; Kambe, N.; Mosso, R.; Drain, K. Laser pyrolysis - a platform technology to produce nanoscale materials for a range of product applications. Nanotech. 2006, 1, 325-328.
Zoom Info
Geranium Nanoparticles
Imaged above (top) are different solutions containing fixed concentrations of Ge NPs with varying quantities of H2O2 (the quantities increase as you move left to right).1 Note that the cuvette on the far left comprises of Ge NPs dispersed in pure water.
The synthesis of the Germanium nanoparticles (Ge NPs) was done via laser pyrolysis (bottom left), a “gas phase process for the synthesis of nanomaterials,” and the size of the Ge NPs was controlled by an etching procedure based on the oxidation of the Ge NPs.12 Adding Ge NPs to solutions of H2O2 cause the Ge NPs to be surrounded by an oxide layer (bottom right), which can be easy removed by treating the Ge NPs with HCl (bottom right).1
To read in detail about the procedure of the synthesis of Ge NPs, I recommend reading through the referenced article. Note that journal access is required. Images courtesy of Kim et. al.

Kim, S.; Walker, B.; Park, S.; Choi, H.; Ko, S.; Jeong, J.; Yun, M.; Lee, J.; Kim, d.; Kim, J. Size tailoring of aqueous germanium nanoparticle dispersion. Nanoscale. 2014. DOI: 10.1039/C4NR01596G


Chiruvolu, S.; Li, W.; Ng, K.; Du, K.; Ting, K.; McGovern, W.E.; Kambe, N.; Mosso, R.; Drain, K. Laser pyrolysis - a platform technology to produce nanoscale materials for a range of product applications. Nanotech. 2006, 1, 325-328.
Zoom Info

Geranium Nanoparticles

Imaged above (top) are different solutions containing fixed concentrations of Ge NPs with varying quantities of H2O2 (the quantities increase as you move left to right).1 Note that the cuvette on the far left comprises of Ge NPs dispersed in pure water.

The synthesis of the Germanium nanoparticles (Ge NPs) was done via laser pyrolysis (bottom left), a “gas phase process for the synthesis of nanomaterials,” and the size of the Ge NPs was controlled by an etching procedure based on the oxidation of the Ge NPs.12 Adding Ge NPs to solutions of H2O2 cause the Ge NPs to be surrounded by an oxide layer (bottom right), which can be easy removed by treating the Ge NPs with HCl (bottom right).1

To read in detail about the procedure of the synthesis of Ge NPs, I recommend reading through the referenced article. Note that journal access is required. Images courtesy of Kim et. al.


  1. Kim, S.; Walker, B.; Park, S.; Choi, H.; Ko, S.; Jeong, J.; Yun, M.; Lee, J.; Kim, d.; Kim, J. Size tailoring of aqueous germanium nanoparticle dispersion. Nanoscale. 2014. DOI: 10.1039/C4NR01596G

  2. Chiruvolu, S.; Li, W.; Ng, K.; Du, K.; Ting, K.; McGovern, W.E.; Kambe, N.; Mosso, R.; Drain, K. Laser pyrolysis - a platform technology to produce nanoscale materials for a range of product applications. Nanotech. 2006, 1, 325-328.

Can Superhydrophobic Surfaces Repel Hot Water?
I’ll admit that while I have studied the hydrophobicity of surfaces in the past, I’ve never thought of the question of whether or not superhydrophobic surfaces can repel hot water. My initial answer was, “Isn’t it obvious? I mean, why wouldn’t it?”
When drops of water fall onto a surface, it will (generally) either spread over the surface or will simply roll/bounce off the surface. The latter case describes a concept called hydrophobicity, a material’s tendency to repel water. Different materials can have different degrees of hydrophobicity.
Leaves (e.g. lotus leaves, as illustrated above) are a nice example of hydrophobic material. Interestingly, as a result of a change in temperature of the water, the droplets of water (25 °C) are more spherical in the left photo, while the droplets of water (55 °C) are more spread out in the right photo (Liu et al.). The respective SEM (scanning electron microscopy) photos are directly below. Liu et al. suggest that the hot water destroy/alter the surface of the material, thus changing its hydrophilic properties.
While yes, superhydrophobic surfaces can repel hot water, it appears as thought the degree of hydrophobicity changes with an increase in temperature. However, the story changes with man-made hydrophobic materials ;)
Liu, Y.; Chen, X.; Xin, J.H. PCan superhydrophobic surfaces repel hot water? J. Mater. Chem. 2009, 19, 5602-5611. DOI: 10.1039/B822168E
Zoom Info
Can Superhydrophobic Surfaces Repel Hot Water?
I’ll admit that while I have studied the hydrophobicity of surfaces in the past, I’ve never thought of the question of whether or not superhydrophobic surfaces can repel hot water. My initial answer was, “Isn’t it obvious? I mean, why wouldn’t it?”
When drops of water fall onto a surface, it will (generally) either spread over the surface or will simply roll/bounce off the surface. The latter case describes a concept called hydrophobicity, a material’s tendency to repel water. Different materials can have different degrees of hydrophobicity.
Leaves (e.g. lotus leaves, as illustrated above) are a nice example of hydrophobic material. Interestingly, as a result of a change in temperature of the water, the droplets of water (25 °C) are more spherical in the left photo, while the droplets of water (55 °C) are more spread out in the right photo (Liu et al.). The respective SEM (scanning electron microscopy) photos are directly below. Liu et al. suggest that the hot water destroy/alter the surface of the material, thus changing its hydrophilic properties.
While yes, superhydrophobic surfaces can repel hot water, it appears as thought the degree of hydrophobicity changes with an increase in temperature. However, the story changes with man-made hydrophobic materials ;)
Liu, Y.; Chen, X.; Xin, J.H. PCan superhydrophobic surfaces repel hot water? J. Mater. Chem. 2009, 19, 5602-5611. DOI: 10.1039/B822168E
Zoom Info

Can Superhydrophobic Surfaces Repel Hot Water?

I’ll admit that while I have studied the hydrophobicity of surfaces in the past, I’ve never thought of the question of whether or not superhydrophobic surfaces can repel hot water. My initial answer was, “Isn’t it obvious? I mean, why wouldn’t it?”

When drops of water fall onto a surface, it will (generally) either spread over the surface or will simply roll/bounce off the surface. The latter case describes a concept called hydrophobicity, a material’s tendency to repel water. Different materials can have different degrees of hydrophobicity.

Leaves (e.g. lotus leaves, as illustrated above) are a nice example of hydrophobic material. Interestingly, as a result of a change in temperature of the water, the droplets of water (25 °C) are more spherical in the left photo, while the droplets of water (55 °C) are more spread out in the right photo (Liu et al.). The respective SEM (scanning electron microscopy) photos are directly below. Liu et al. suggest that the hot water destroy/alter the surface of the material, thus changing its hydrophilic properties.

While yes, superhydrophobic surfaces can repel hot water, it appears as thought the degree of hydrophobicity changes with an increase in temperature. However, the story changes with man-made hydrophobic materials ;)


Liu, Y.; Chen, X.; Xin, J.H. PCan superhydrophobic surfaces repel hot water? J. Mater. Chem. 2009, 19, 5602-5611. DOI: 10.1039/B822168E

Sokobond, a Chemistry-based Puzzle Game, Coming to Steam
Sokobond, described as “the best chemistry themed 2D indie puzzle game where you’re trying to make molecules (since SpaceChem),” is coming to Steam on July 21st for $10. The objective of the minimalistic game, Sokobond, is for players to link together atoms, provided on a variety of grids, together to form molecules.
Initially, Sokobond will only be available for Windows PC, Mac, and Linux platforms. However, there are plans to eventually have Sokobond available on iOS and Android.
By Sokobond, via Polygon.
Zoom Info
Sokobond, a Chemistry-based Puzzle Game, Coming to Steam
Sokobond, described as “the best chemistry themed 2D indie puzzle game where you’re trying to make molecules (since SpaceChem),” is coming to Steam on July 21st for $10. The objective of the minimalistic game, Sokobond, is for players to link together atoms, provided on a variety of grids, together to form molecules.
Initially, Sokobond will only be available for Windows PC, Mac, and Linux platforms. However, there are plans to eventually have Sokobond available on iOS and Android.
By Sokobond, via Polygon.
Zoom Info
Sokobond, a Chemistry-based Puzzle Game, Coming to Steam
Sokobond, described as “the best chemistry themed 2D indie puzzle game where you’re trying to make molecules (since SpaceChem),” is coming to Steam on July 21st for $10. The objective of the minimalistic game, Sokobond, is for players to link together atoms, provided on a variety of grids, together to form molecules.
Initially, Sokobond will only be available for Windows PC, Mac, and Linux platforms. However, there are plans to eventually have Sokobond available on iOS and Android.
By Sokobond, via Polygon.
Zoom Info
Sokobond, a Chemistry-based Puzzle Game, Coming to Steam
Sokobond, described as “the best chemistry themed 2D indie puzzle game where you’re trying to make molecules (since SpaceChem),” is coming to Steam on July 21st for $10. The objective of the minimalistic game, Sokobond, is for players to link together atoms, provided on a variety of grids, together to form molecules.
Initially, Sokobond will only be available for Windows PC, Mac, and Linux platforms. However, there are plans to eventually have Sokobond available on iOS and Android.
By Sokobond, via Polygon.
Zoom Info

Sokobond, a Chemistry-based Puzzle Game, Coming to Steam

Sokobond, described as “the best chemistry themed 2D indie puzzle game where you’re trying to make molecules (since SpaceChem),” is coming to Steam on July 21st for $10. The objective of the minimalistic game, Sokobond, is for players to link together atoms, provided on a variety of grids, together to form molecules.

Initially, Sokobond will only be available for Windows PC, Mac, and Linux platforms. However, there are plans to eventually have Sokobond available on iOS and Android.

By Sokobond, via Polygon.

labphoto:

Vacuum distillation of the product of an Eschweiler–Clarke reaction. 
From a yellowish-brown oil, a colorless, fruity fragrant oil distilled, hope that the next reaction step will work as well, as this did. 
P.S.: that brown thing at the left is an oil bath, what we use to heat up flasks over 100 °C. The reason why it’s brown and not transparent, is that it contains a lot gunk.

Shout out to all my colleagues who have done me a solid and grabbed me the “cleanest” oil baths!
Zoom Info

labphoto:

Vacuum distillation of the product of an Eschweiler–Clarke reaction. 

From a yellowish-brown oil, a colorless, fruity fragrant oil distilled, hope that the next reaction step will work as well, as this did. 

P.S.: that brown thing at the left is an oil bath, what we use to heat up flasks over 100 °C. The reason why it’s brown and not transparent, is that it contains a lot gunk.

Shout out to all my colleagues who have done me a solid and grabbed me the “cleanest” oil baths!

zerostatereflex:

How Ink is Made
(I left out a couple parts for clarity, where towards the end they add wax and fillers, though please watch the video. It’s beautifully shot and goes into more detail,..)
(plus it has epic orchestral music in the background which makes any learning experience more badass).
Zoom Info
zerostatereflex:

How Ink is Made
(I left out a couple parts for clarity, where towards the end they add wax and fillers, though please watch the video. It’s beautifully shot and goes into more detail,..)
(plus it has epic orchestral music in the background which makes any learning experience more badass).
Zoom Info
zerostatereflex:

How Ink is Made
(I left out a couple parts for clarity, where towards the end they add wax and fillers, though please watch the video. It’s beautifully shot and goes into more detail,..)
(plus it has epic orchestral music in the background which makes any learning experience more badass).
Zoom Info
zerostatereflex:

How Ink is Made
(I left out a couple parts for clarity, where towards the end they add wax and fillers, though please watch the video. It’s beautifully shot and goes into more detail,..)
(plus it has epic orchestral music in the background which makes any learning experience more badass).
Zoom Info
zerostatereflex:

How Ink is Made
(I left out a couple parts for clarity, where towards the end they add wax and fillers, though please watch the video. It’s beautifully shot and goes into more detail,..)
(plus it has epic orchestral music in the background which makes any learning experience more badass).
Zoom Info
zerostatereflex:

How Ink is Made
(I left out a couple parts for clarity, where towards the end they add wax and fillers, though please watch the video. It’s beautifully shot and goes into more detail,..)
(plus it has epic orchestral music in the background which makes any learning experience more badass).
Zoom Info
zerostatereflex:

How Ink is Made
(I left out a couple parts for clarity, where towards the end they add wax and fillers, though please watch the video. It’s beautifully shot and goes into more detail,..)
(plus it has epic orchestral music in the background which makes any learning experience more badass).
Zoom Info
zerostatereflex:

How Ink is Made
(I left out a couple parts for clarity, where towards the end they add wax and fillers, though please watch the video. It’s beautifully shot and goes into more detail,..)
(plus it has epic orchestral music in the background which makes any learning experience more badass).
Zoom Info
zerostatereflex:

How Ink is Made
(I left out a couple parts for clarity, where towards the end they add wax and fillers, though please watch the video. It’s beautifully shot and goes into more detail,..)
(plus it has epic orchestral music in the background which makes any learning experience more badass).
Zoom Info
zerostatereflex:

How Ink is Made
(I left out a couple parts for clarity, where towards the end they add wax and fillers, though please watch the video. It’s beautifully shot and goes into more detail,..)
(plus it has epic orchestral music in the background which makes any learning experience more badass).
Zoom Info

zerostatereflex:

How Ink is Made

(I left out a couple parts for clarity, where towards the end they add wax and fillers, though please watch the video. It’s beautifully shot and goes into more detail,..)

(plus it has epic orchestral music in the background which makes any learning experience more badass).

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