Allena Nguyen

Research Assistant (Co-Op) at AFCC
Executive at UBC Undergraduate Chemistry Society

I am a highly motivated third year UBC chemistry co-op student with strong interests in materials chemistry, nanotechnology, and climate change. Ultimately, I am hoping to research and develop products and technology that contribute to climate mitigation.

More About Me

I am a UBC chemistry co-op student with strong interests in materials chemistry, nanotechnology, and climate change. Ultimately, I am hoping to research and develop products and technology that contribute to climate mitigation.

I am currently working as a research assistant at AFCC, and am involved with developing and performing experiments to design and characterize anode catalyst inks for PEM fuel cells, and supporting the prototyping team through studying various ink formulations and preparation processes.

You can contact me at allenanguyen@gmail.com

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txchnologist:


Flow Masters
by Michael Keller
Over the last decade, materials scientists have been trying really hard to keep from getting wet. To that end, they’ve made huge strides developing coatings that so thoroughly repel dirt and water, they seem almost magic. Their secret? Recreating the nanoscale structures that some organisms employ to stay clean and dry and to redirect liquid flow. 
Among researchers’ muses from the natural world are the stenocara beetle, lotus and nasturtium leaves, and the wings of butterflies. The National Science Foundation has compiled some compelling visual examples of natural and synthesized superhydrophobic surfaces. See the full video below. 
Read More
Zoom Info
txchnologist:


Flow Masters
by Michael Keller
Over the last decade, materials scientists have been trying really hard to keep from getting wet. To that end, they’ve made huge strides developing coatings that so thoroughly repel dirt and water, they seem almost magic. Their secret? Recreating the nanoscale structures that some organisms employ to stay clean and dry and to redirect liquid flow. 
Among researchers’ muses from the natural world are the stenocara beetle, lotus and nasturtium leaves, and the wings of butterflies. The National Science Foundation has compiled some compelling visual examples of natural and synthesized superhydrophobic surfaces. See the full video below. 
Read More
Zoom Info
txchnologist:


Flow Masters
by Michael Keller
Over the last decade, materials scientists have been trying really hard to keep from getting wet. To that end, they’ve made huge strides developing coatings that so thoroughly repel dirt and water, they seem almost magic. Their secret? Recreating the nanoscale structures that some organisms employ to stay clean and dry and to redirect liquid flow. 
Among researchers’ muses from the natural world are the stenocara beetle, lotus and nasturtium leaves, and the wings of butterflies. The National Science Foundation has compiled some compelling visual examples of natural and synthesized superhydrophobic surfaces. See the full video below. 
Read More
Zoom Info
txchnologist:


Flow Masters
by Michael Keller
Over the last decade, materials scientists have been trying really hard to keep from getting wet. To that end, they’ve made huge strides developing coatings that so thoroughly repel dirt and water, they seem almost magic. Their secret? Recreating the nanoscale structures that some organisms employ to stay clean and dry and to redirect liquid flow. 
Among researchers’ muses from the natural world are the stenocara beetle, lotus and nasturtium leaves, and the wings of butterflies. The National Science Foundation has compiled some compelling visual examples of natural and synthesized superhydrophobic surfaces. See the full video below. 
Read More
Zoom Info
txchnologist:


Flow Masters
by Michael Keller
Over the last decade, materials scientists have been trying really hard to keep from getting wet. To that end, they’ve made huge strides developing coatings that so thoroughly repel dirt and water, they seem almost magic. Their secret? Recreating the nanoscale structures that some organisms employ to stay clean and dry and to redirect liquid flow. 
Among researchers’ muses from the natural world are the stenocara beetle, lotus and nasturtium leaves, and the wings of butterflies. The National Science Foundation has compiled some compelling visual examples of natural and synthesized superhydrophobic surfaces. See the full video below. 
Read More
Zoom Info
txchnologist:


Flow Masters
by Michael Keller
Over the last decade, materials scientists have been trying really hard to keep from getting wet. To that end, they’ve made huge strides developing coatings that so thoroughly repel dirt and water, they seem almost magic. Their secret? Recreating the nanoscale structures that some organisms employ to stay clean and dry and to redirect liquid flow. 
Among researchers’ muses from the natural world are the stenocara beetle, lotus and nasturtium leaves, and the wings of butterflies. The National Science Foundation has compiled some compelling visual examples of natural and synthesized superhydrophobic surfaces. See the full video below. 
Read More
Zoom Info
txchnologist:


Flow Masters
by Michael Keller
Over the last decade, materials scientists have been trying really hard to keep from getting wet. To that end, they’ve made huge strides developing coatings that so thoroughly repel dirt and water, they seem almost magic. Their secret? Recreating the nanoscale structures that some organisms employ to stay clean and dry and to redirect liquid flow. 
Among researchers’ muses from the natural world are the stenocara beetle, lotus and nasturtium leaves, and the wings of butterflies. The National Science Foundation has compiled some compelling visual examples of natural and synthesized superhydrophobic surfaces. See the full video below. 
Read More
Zoom Info

txchnologist:

Flow Masters

by Michael Keller

Over the last decade, materials scientists have been trying really hard to keep from getting wet. To that end, they’ve made huge strides developing coatings that so thoroughly repel dirt and water, they seem almost magic. Their secret? Recreating the nanoscale structures that some organisms employ to stay clean and dry and to redirect liquid flow. 

Among researchers’ muses from the natural world are the stenocara beetle, lotus and nasturtium leaves, and the wings of butterflies. The National Science Foundation has compiled some compelling visual examples of natural and synthesized superhydrophobic surfaces. See the full video below. 

Read More

Geranium Nanoparticles
Imaged above (top) are different solutions containing fixed concentrations of Ge NPs with varying quantities of H2O2 (the quantities increase as you move left to right).1 Note that the cuvette on the far left comprises of Ge NPs dispersed in pure water.
The synthesis of the Germanium nanoparticles (Ge NPs) was done via laser pyrolysis (bottom left), a “gas phase process for the synthesis of nanomaterials,” and the size of the Ge NPs was controlled by an etching procedure based on the oxidation of the Ge NPs.12 Adding Ge NPs to solutions of H2O2 cause the Ge NPs to be surrounded by an oxide layer (bottom right), which can be easy removed by treating the Ge NPs with HCl (bottom right).1
To read in detail about the procedure of the synthesis of Ge NPs, I recommend reading through the referenced article. Note that journal access is required. Images courtesy of Kim et. al.

Kim, S.; Walker, B.; Park, S.; Choi, H.; Ko, S.; Jeong, J.; Yun, M.; Lee, J.; Kim, d.; Kim, J. Size tailoring of aqueous germanium nanoparticle dispersion. Nanoscale. 2014. DOI: 10.1039/C4NR01596G


Chiruvolu, S.; Li, W.; Ng, K.; Du, K.; Ting, K.; McGovern, W.E.; Kambe, N.; Mosso, R.; Drain, K. Laser pyrolysis - a platform technology to produce nanoscale materials for a range of product applications. Nanotech. 2006, 1, 325-328.
Zoom Info
Geranium Nanoparticles
Imaged above (top) are different solutions containing fixed concentrations of Ge NPs with varying quantities of H2O2 (the quantities increase as you move left to right).1 Note that the cuvette on the far left comprises of Ge NPs dispersed in pure water.
The synthesis of the Germanium nanoparticles (Ge NPs) was done via laser pyrolysis (bottom left), a “gas phase process for the synthesis of nanomaterials,” and the size of the Ge NPs was controlled by an etching procedure based on the oxidation of the Ge NPs.12 Adding Ge NPs to solutions of H2O2 cause the Ge NPs to be surrounded by an oxide layer (bottom right), which can be easy removed by treating the Ge NPs with HCl (bottom right).1
To read in detail about the procedure of the synthesis of Ge NPs, I recommend reading through the referenced article. Note that journal access is required. Images courtesy of Kim et. al.

Kim, S.; Walker, B.; Park, S.; Choi, H.; Ko, S.; Jeong, J.; Yun, M.; Lee, J.; Kim, d.; Kim, J. Size tailoring of aqueous germanium nanoparticle dispersion. Nanoscale. 2014. DOI: 10.1039/C4NR01596G


Chiruvolu, S.; Li, W.; Ng, K.; Du, K.; Ting, K.; McGovern, W.E.; Kambe, N.; Mosso, R.; Drain, K. Laser pyrolysis - a platform technology to produce nanoscale materials for a range of product applications. Nanotech. 2006, 1, 325-328.
Zoom Info

Geranium Nanoparticles

Imaged above (top) are different solutions containing fixed concentrations of Ge NPs with varying quantities of H2O2 (the quantities increase as you move left to right).1 Note that the cuvette on the far left comprises of Ge NPs dispersed in pure water.

The synthesis of the Germanium nanoparticles (Ge NPs) was done via laser pyrolysis (bottom left), a “gas phase process for the synthesis of nanomaterials,” and the size of the Ge NPs was controlled by an etching procedure based on the oxidation of the Ge NPs.12 Adding Ge NPs to solutions of H2O2 cause the Ge NPs to be surrounded by an oxide layer (bottom right), which can be easy removed by treating the Ge NPs with HCl (bottom right).1

To read in detail about the procedure of the synthesis of Ge NPs, I recommend reading through the referenced article. Note that journal access is required. Images courtesy of Kim et. al.


  1. Kim, S.; Walker, B.; Park, S.; Choi, H.; Ko, S.; Jeong, J.; Yun, M.; Lee, J.; Kim, d.; Kim, J. Size tailoring of aqueous germanium nanoparticle dispersion. Nanoscale. 2014. DOI: 10.1039/C4NR01596G

  2. Chiruvolu, S.; Li, W.; Ng, K.; Du, K.; Ting, K.; McGovern, W.E.; Kambe, N.; Mosso, R.; Drain, K. Laser pyrolysis - a platform technology to produce nanoscale materials for a range of product applications. Nanotech. 2006, 1, 325-328.

Can Superhydrophobic Surfaces Repel Hot Water?
I’ll admit that while I have studied the hydrophobicity of surfaces in the past, I’ve never thought of the question of whether or not superhydrophobic surfaces can repel hot water. My initial answer was, “Isn’t it obvious? I mean, why wouldn’t it?”
When drops of water fall onto a surface, it will (generally) either spread over the surface or will simply roll/bounce off the surface. The latter case describes a concept called hydrophobicity, a material’s tendency to repel water. Different materials can have different degrees of hydrophobicity.
Leaves (e.g. lotus leaves, as illustrated above) are a nice example of hydrophobic material. Interestingly, as a result of a change in temperature of the water, the droplets of water (25 °C) are more spherical in the left photo, while the droplets of water (55 °C) are more spread out in the right photo (Liu et al.). The respective SEM (scanning electron microscopy) photos are directly below. Liu et al. suggest that the hot water destroy/alter the surface of the material, thus changing its hydrophilic properties.
While yes, superhydrophobic surfaces can repel hot water, it appears as thought the degree of hydrophobicity changes with an increase in temperature. However, the story changes with man-made hydrophobic materials ;)
Liu, Y.; Chen, X.; Xin, J.H. PCan superhydrophobic surfaces repel hot water? J. Mater. Chem. 2009, 19, 5602-5611. DOI: 10.1039/B822168E
Zoom Info
Can Superhydrophobic Surfaces Repel Hot Water?
I’ll admit that while I have studied the hydrophobicity of surfaces in the past, I’ve never thought of the question of whether or not superhydrophobic surfaces can repel hot water. My initial answer was, “Isn’t it obvious? I mean, why wouldn’t it?”
When drops of water fall onto a surface, it will (generally) either spread over the surface or will simply roll/bounce off the surface. The latter case describes a concept called hydrophobicity, a material’s tendency to repel water. Different materials can have different degrees of hydrophobicity.
Leaves (e.g. lotus leaves, as illustrated above) are a nice example of hydrophobic material. Interestingly, as a result of a change in temperature of the water, the droplets of water (25 °C) are more spherical in the left photo, while the droplets of water (55 °C) are more spread out in the right photo (Liu et al.). The respective SEM (scanning electron microscopy) photos are directly below. Liu et al. suggest that the hot water destroy/alter the surface of the material, thus changing its hydrophilic properties.
While yes, superhydrophobic surfaces can repel hot water, it appears as thought the degree of hydrophobicity changes with an increase in temperature. However, the story changes with man-made hydrophobic materials ;)
Liu, Y.; Chen, X.; Xin, J.H. PCan superhydrophobic surfaces repel hot water? J. Mater. Chem. 2009, 19, 5602-5611. DOI: 10.1039/B822168E
Zoom Info

Can Superhydrophobic Surfaces Repel Hot Water?

I’ll admit that while I have studied the hydrophobicity of surfaces in the past, I’ve never thought of the question of whether or not superhydrophobic surfaces can repel hot water. My initial answer was, “Isn’t it obvious? I mean, why wouldn’t it?”

When drops of water fall onto a surface, it will (generally) either spread over the surface or will simply roll/bounce off the surface. The latter case describes a concept called hydrophobicity, a material’s tendency to repel water. Different materials can have different degrees of hydrophobicity.

Leaves (e.g. lotus leaves, as illustrated above) are a nice example of hydrophobic material. Interestingly, as a result of a change in temperature of the water, the droplets of water (25 °C) are more spherical in the left photo, while the droplets of water (55 °C) are more spread out in the right photo (Liu et al.). The respective SEM (scanning electron microscopy) photos are directly below. Liu et al. suggest that the hot water destroy/alter the surface of the material, thus changing its hydrophilic properties.

While yes, superhydrophobic surfaces can repel hot water, it appears as thought the degree of hydrophobicity changes with an increase in temperature. However, the story changes with man-made hydrophobic materials ;)


Liu, Y.; Chen, X.; Xin, J.H. PCan superhydrophobic surfaces repel hot water? J. Mater. Chem. 2009, 19, 5602-5611. DOI: 10.1039/B822168E

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