Allena Nguyen

Research Assistant (Co-Op) at AFCC
Executive at UBC Undergraduate Chemistry Society

I am a highly motivated third year UBC chemistry co-op student with strong interests in materials chemistry, nanotechnology, and climate change. Ultimately, I am hoping to research and develop products and technology that contribute to climate mitigation.

More About Me

I am a UBC chemistry co-op student with strong interests in materials chemistry, nanotechnology, and climate change. Ultimately, I am hoping to research and develop products and technology that contribute to climate mitigation.

I am currently working as a research assistant at AFCC, and am involved with developing and performing experiments to design and characterize anode catalyst inks for PEM fuel cells, and supporting the prototyping team through studying various ink formulations and preparation processes.

You can contact me at allenanguyen@gmail.com

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Attn: Chemistry students/Chemists on Tumblr who use OS X.

Does anybody know of any (decent) chemistry add-ins for Microsoft Word 2011 for OS X? I’m not even sure if this kind of thing currently exists.

I would appreciate if Word didn’t think 90% of my report was misspelled. I’m sure many other people can share my frustration ;)

Mandatory question mark at the end of my post so people can reply ?

molecularlifesciences:

jtotheizzoe:

Coming to YouTube on August 19th! 

Frankenstein M.D. is a modern re-telling of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, from Pemberley Digital, the same people who brought you The Lizzie Bennett Diaries and Emma Approved, and PBS Digital Studios. The story centers around Victoria Frankenstein (rather than “Victor” from the book), an eccentric and driven MD/PhD student who wants to prove herself in the traditionally male-dominated field of medical research. Basically, this is what we would get if Mary Shelley created a YouTube science show :)

I’m also happy to announce that I’m lending my PhD chops and serving as science consultant for the series, which is SO FUN!!! I’m working hard to make sure the science you’ll see in the series is the real thing. At least in theory. I mean, we can’t really bring frightening creatures back from the dead. Yet.

Check out the full details on the series, the cast, and the premiere here. And, just like the worlds of Lizzie Bennet and Emma Woodhouse, the Frankenstein universe will be bigger than just the videos. Here’s a few links so you can start following the characters:

Mary Shelley, the first sci-fi writer.

This is very exciting to hear! I’m a huge fan of the Lizzie Bennett Diaries, Joe, and Frankenstein! What an amazing combination!

compoundchem:

Ever wondered how much water/caffeine/alcohol you’d need to drink to reach a lethal dose? This graphic shows the median lethal dose for all three!

Read more detail about LD50 tests in the accompanying post: http://wp.me/p4aPLT-ol

A huge problem with a lot of misinformed people and “hazardous chemicals” is that while on one hand, certain things can be lethal in large doses, but on the other hand, they are oftentimes harmless because we exposed to relatively small concentrations at a time.

Believe it or not, water is a chemical! But wait! If it’s a chemical, it’s dangerous, right? Well, yes, and no. As illustrated above, consuming huge amounts of water can be harmful. However, most of us consume much less than 6 litres of water in one sitting, so it’s relatively quite harmless to us. 

With every chemical (i.e. everything), we always need to think about how much of this substance/chemical/material/etc. we are being exposed to, and whether or not that specific concentration is harmful to us.

txchnologist:


Flow Masters
by Michael Keller
Over the last decade, materials scientists have been trying really hard to keep from getting wet. To that end, they’ve made huge strides developing coatings that so thoroughly repel dirt and water, they seem almost magic. Their secret? Recreating the nanoscale structures that some organisms employ to stay clean and dry and to redirect liquid flow. 
Among researchers’ muses from the natural world are the stenocara beetle, lotus and nasturtium leaves, and the wings of butterflies. The National Science Foundation has compiled some compelling visual examples of natural and synthesized superhydrophobic surfaces. See the full video below. 
Read More
Zoom Info
txchnologist:


Flow Masters
by Michael Keller
Over the last decade, materials scientists have been trying really hard to keep from getting wet. To that end, they’ve made huge strides developing coatings that so thoroughly repel dirt and water, they seem almost magic. Their secret? Recreating the nanoscale structures that some organisms employ to stay clean and dry and to redirect liquid flow. 
Among researchers’ muses from the natural world are the stenocara beetle, lotus and nasturtium leaves, and the wings of butterflies. The National Science Foundation has compiled some compelling visual examples of natural and synthesized superhydrophobic surfaces. See the full video below. 
Read More
Zoom Info
txchnologist:


Flow Masters
by Michael Keller
Over the last decade, materials scientists have been trying really hard to keep from getting wet. To that end, they’ve made huge strides developing coatings that so thoroughly repel dirt and water, they seem almost magic. Their secret? Recreating the nanoscale structures that some organisms employ to stay clean and dry and to redirect liquid flow. 
Among researchers’ muses from the natural world are the stenocara beetle, lotus and nasturtium leaves, and the wings of butterflies. The National Science Foundation has compiled some compelling visual examples of natural and synthesized superhydrophobic surfaces. See the full video below. 
Read More
Zoom Info
txchnologist:


Flow Masters
by Michael Keller
Over the last decade, materials scientists have been trying really hard to keep from getting wet. To that end, they’ve made huge strides developing coatings that so thoroughly repel dirt and water, they seem almost magic. Their secret? Recreating the nanoscale structures that some organisms employ to stay clean and dry and to redirect liquid flow. 
Among researchers’ muses from the natural world are the stenocara beetle, lotus and nasturtium leaves, and the wings of butterflies. The National Science Foundation has compiled some compelling visual examples of natural and synthesized superhydrophobic surfaces. See the full video below. 
Read More
Zoom Info
txchnologist:


Flow Masters
by Michael Keller
Over the last decade, materials scientists have been trying really hard to keep from getting wet. To that end, they’ve made huge strides developing coatings that so thoroughly repel dirt and water, they seem almost magic. Their secret? Recreating the nanoscale structures that some organisms employ to stay clean and dry and to redirect liquid flow. 
Among researchers’ muses from the natural world are the stenocara beetle, lotus and nasturtium leaves, and the wings of butterflies. The National Science Foundation has compiled some compelling visual examples of natural and synthesized superhydrophobic surfaces. See the full video below. 
Read More
Zoom Info
txchnologist:


Flow Masters
by Michael Keller
Over the last decade, materials scientists have been trying really hard to keep from getting wet. To that end, they’ve made huge strides developing coatings that so thoroughly repel dirt and water, they seem almost magic. Their secret? Recreating the nanoscale structures that some organisms employ to stay clean and dry and to redirect liquid flow. 
Among researchers’ muses from the natural world are the stenocara beetle, lotus and nasturtium leaves, and the wings of butterflies. The National Science Foundation has compiled some compelling visual examples of natural and synthesized superhydrophobic surfaces. See the full video below. 
Read More
Zoom Info
txchnologist:


Flow Masters
by Michael Keller
Over the last decade, materials scientists have been trying really hard to keep from getting wet. To that end, they’ve made huge strides developing coatings that so thoroughly repel dirt and water, they seem almost magic. Their secret? Recreating the nanoscale structures that some organisms employ to stay clean and dry and to redirect liquid flow. 
Among researchers’ muses from the natural world are the stenocara beetle, lotus and nasturtium leaves, and the wings of butterflies. The National Science Foundation has compiled some compelling visual examples of natural and synthesized superhydrophobic surfaces. See the full video below. 
Read More
Zoom Info

txchnologist:

Flow Masters

by Michael Keller

Over the last decade, materials scientists have been trying really hard to keep from getting wet. To that end, they’ve made huge strides developing coatings that so thoroughly repel dirt and water, they seem almost magic. Their secret? Recreating the nanoscale structures that some organisms employ to stay clean and dry and to redirect liquid flow. 

Among researchers’ muses from the natural world are the stenocara beetle, lotus and nasturtium leaves, and the wings of butterflies. The National Science Foundation has compiled some compelling visual examples of natural and synthesized superhydrophobic surfaces. See the full video below. 

Read More

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